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Queer Eye on Netflix: The new reality show everyone’s talking about

You may have noticed absolutely everyone’s talking about Queer Eye, Netflix’s newest reality TV show which sees a group of gay men use their expertise in areas like fashion, interior design and culture to transform the lives of men in need of a little help.

In case you haven’t watched any episodes yet, here’s what you need to know about the reality TV show Queer Eye

Queer Eye – What’s it about?

The show is a re-vamp of a previous incarnation that aired in the early 2000s. Queer Eye For The Straight Guy was first created in 2003, won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Reality Programme in 2004 and continued for five series until the show finally ended in 2007.

Fast forward 11 years and Netflix has brought back Queer Eye for an eight-episode run, with an all new ‘Fab Five’ on hand to help the men of Georgia, USA.

The Fab Five is the name for the group of men who lead the show, appearing in each episode offering up their expertise. The group is made up of Karamo (an expert in culture), Tan (an expert in fashion), Jonathan (an expert in grooming), Bobby (an expert in interior design) and Antoni (an expert in cooking.)

MORE: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE CROWN SEASON 3 Antoni giving a cooking lesson. (Image: Netflix)

The Fab Five travel around Georgia, visiting men who’ve been nominated by friends and family to receive a little help getting their homes, fashion, grooming regime and other elements of their lives in order.

As well as helping with aesthetic elements, the Fab Five also offer emotional support and give the men a boost in self-confidence. Bobby reveals a home makeover. (Image: Netflix)

Queer Eye – Get to know the Fab Five

Jonathan Van Ness

Jonathan is a grooming expert who helps the men of Queer Eye to look after themselves on the outside in order to feel good about themselves on the inside.

Karamo Brown

Karamo is an expert in culture, who works with the men of Queer Eye to enhance their social and romantic lives. He also offers personal branding and career advice.

Tan France

Tan is a style expert who transforms the wardobes of the men taking part in the Queer Eye makeover process.

Bobby Berk

Bobby is an interior design expert and leads the process of making over homes to better reflect the personalities of the men taking part in Queer Eye.

Antoni Porowski

Antoni is a food expert who teaches the men he works with about how to follow healthy eating habits and entertain using food.

MORE: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT DOCTOR FOSTER SEASON 3

Queer Eye – Will it be back for another season?

At the minute, Netflix hasn’t announced any plans for another run of episodes, however the season that landed on the streaming site in February 2018 has been praised so much by fans that we imagine it’s only a matter of time before the Fab Five are back on the road changing lives.

(Image: Netflix) (Main image: Netflix) Like this?

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‘I was on Married At First Sight and this is what it’s ACTUALLY like’

Married At First Sight, the Channel 4 show which aims to match people on their scientific compatibility, is the nation’s current obsession.Clark met – and married – Melissa for the first time, surrounded by family and friends (and a camera crew!) in June 2016, when taking part in series two.

Although the general public were rooting for their relationship, Clarissa didn’t quite get their happily ever after. In fact, following their honeymoon in Ibiza, a six-week stint in an Airbnb in East Finchley (paid for by Channel 4), and a month move to Milton Keynes, Clark asked for a divorce at the end of September 2016.

18-months on, he looks back on the experience, and reveals what it’s ACTUALLY like to be on Married At First Sight

‘The advert for a social experiment came up on Tinder’ “I was hungover and flicking through Tinder, and something popped up that said, ‘Do you want to be part of a social experiment with Channel 4?’ On a whim I emailed across a photo, my age, all those standard formalities, and thought nothing of it when I received a response that said, ‘Due to high volumes of applications you probably won’t hear anything, but thank you for responding’. “9am the following Monday, I got a phone call saying ‘Clark, we’re really interested in your profile.

Can you talk us through your story, who you are, all that kind of stuff’.” ‘I didn’t know it was Married At First Sight until I was deep in the process’ “When they asked me the questions, they said, ‘We’re a production company.

We’re doing a screening for a Channel 4 programme. We want to talk to you about you, your dating history, that’s what it’s going to revolve around’. I didn’t know what it was for until after they had tested me for video screening.

You’re far enough into the process not to turn back when they tell you it’s Married At First Sight. “Nobody’s forcing you to go through with the process, but there are definitely pressures. You feel like you’re too far in to back out.

I would talk to people about it and nine times out of 10 they thought it was a terrible idea.” MORE: HOW COUPLES GETTING MARRIED ON THE SAME DAY AS THE ROYAL WEDDING REALLY FEEL ABOUT IT

‘Producers never really explain what the scientific tests are for’ “The science day was, if I’m honest, pretty pointless. I understand it probably all makes sense, but it was never explained to us how it makes sense and how we were matched on the scientific perspective.

They measure your height, your shoulder to waist ratio, the size of your index fingers, all of that, but I kind of felt like, ‘OK, how does this actually have any impact on a future relationship in this day and age?'” ‘The questionnaire that you’re matched on is incredibly detailed’ “It was a 500 question questionnaire that goes through your likes, your don’t likes, all the intricate pieces of information about you.

Your religious views, your political views, what you find attractive, your sexual history, are you sexually active. If you want to match with someone of the same ilk as you, you’d like to think they match you on the same morals and what you’ve said when you’re doing it.” ‘Your social media is hidden during the build up to the show’

“I had no interest in getting to know the other couples. You never meet anyone else in the process – during the science day you meet a couple of other people, but you never meet any of the other couples throughout the whole programme. There’s no crossover.

All your social media is hidden, there’s no way you can find anyone. I had no interest in it, though, because once I watched the programme I knew for a fact I wouldn’t get on with these people and they wouldn’t be my friends – that’s not horrible to them, we’re just very different people.” ‘There’s a small budget for the wedding dress, and stag-dos’

“But there’s no financial gain from going on the show. There’s budget for things – her wedding dress, a small budget for the suits. There’s some money for hen-do and stag-dos, but it was mainly out of my pocket.

I think they put money towards travel or something. But there was genuinely no monetary gain. Lots of people think, ‘No one would do that for free’, but actually I spent quite a lot of money on the process.”

‘You choose the wedding you want from a powerpoint presentation of options’ “There are six options of lots of different things – type of food, music, style and theme of wedding.

Everything that I chose didn’t get picked! Everything was chosen by her. None of my decisions were considered.

From what I understand, Melissa got what she wanted for the wedding – but I believe the wedding day is about the woman anyway, so it was fine.” ‘You can only invite a limited number of people’ “You also have a guest limit – I was only allowed to invite 20 people.

It definitely caused some friction with some of the family members! The whole day for me was a bit of a blur, it happened quickly but not memorably. It’s really hard to explain.

The day started at 9am with my groomsmen getting ready, it didn’t sink in until the taxi on the way there. I was nervous standing in the room waiting to meet her family; my side was packed out with friends and family as much as possible.”

MORE: THIS IS THE NEW FAVOURITE NAME FOR THE DUKE AND DUCHESS’S THIRD CHILD, ACCORDING TO BOOKMAKERS ‘We had to say ‘I Do’ twice for different camera angles’ “Obviously there were production people giving you directions of where to sit, where to stand, where to go on the wedding day.

We had to repeat our lines – our vows to each other – a couple of times, and say ‘I Do’ for different camera angles. “It didn’t ever feel forced, though. I had a great team and camera crew from Channel 4.

They were fantastic. There were times when we got frustrated with each other when they were getting heavily involved when I was trying to chill out for the afternoon, but actually I struck up a friendship with them. After the show, I realised that they were doing it for the show.

They were just doing their jobs.” ‘We both think we were matched with other people before each other’ “They asked me in the questionnaire to define ‘my type’, and you have to detail the height you like, body type, tattoos, all these sorts of things.

I put high on my criteria that they had to be at least 5ft 5″ to 6ft, and Melissa is 5ft. I’m 6ft3″. So I did feel like they hadn’t really matched us on my criteria.

“We both think we were matched with other people before and they pulled out half way through the process. We spoke about it, I genuinely believe that’s the case. When I decided I didn’t want to be with her anymore, it became quite apparent that we weren’t meant to be a match.”

‘You were meant to live in London to apply for the process’ “I think you were meant to live in London to be part of the process, but Melissa didn’t say she was moving back to Milton Keynes in her application. One of the guys was from Bournemouth, one of the guys was from Bromley.

There was no real thought behind where we were living. I think Channel 4 massively messed up because our lives were never going to work together.” ‘We had Skype counselling with the relationship advisor from the show, but it wasn’t very good’

“When we had our first big issue, we did a Skype counselling session with Channel 4’s relationship advisor, Jo. And we talked through and explained the situation to her, and I just didn’t feel supported. I didn’t feel like it was worthwhile, it was rubbish.

It didn’t have any positive impact on the marriage – if anything it made me resent the situation more.” ‘I hadn’t seen her for a year when we got a divorce’

“The divorce was an easy process. I went in to sign a couple of papers in June 2017, and then I had to sign some more in September, and then the divorce went through on November 13th 2017. I didn’t see her in that time at all – the last time I saw her was in October 2016, when she left me in the flat in Milton Keynes.”

‘Channel 4 set budget aside for the divorce’ “You have to let producers know when you want a divorce – budget was already set aside for it. The money was already in place when they put the bid in for the programme.

“You have to legally be married for a year before you can apply for a divorce, so I had to wait until June 19 2017 before I could apply for a divorce. When I sat down with the production crew and explained to them why I was making my decision, they understood, they apologised, they said they were sorry they didn’t support me. There was some support from the relationship counsellor Jo in the beginning, and that was it.”

‘They asked me to go through the ins and outs of the break up on camera’ “During the series, there’s an episode where I was in a pub with my best friend, and before filming started I just lost it and reeled through everything [that had gone wrong in the relationship], and the camera man was like, ‘You need to say this on camera’, and I was like, ‘There’s no way in hell I’m saying all of this on camera.

One, it’ll make me look like an arsehole, and two, I would never want to put Melissa in a situation where it has an impact on her’.” ‘The process never felt fake, but it was very full on for six months up until the wedding, and then no support afterwards’ “It was 100 per cent real.

It was very straight lace. Everything had a process, everything was being done, but as soon as you were married, you were left to your own devices as a married couple for a few weeks. You go on honeymoon, you move back to the apartment they rent for you.

You’re now living with a complete and utter stranger, which is fine, and the camera crew pop in once, twice, three times a week to talk to you to see how everything’s going, but that’s it. “I felt like there should be more to it. I felt like there should be more actions around helping develop the relationship – there was no support [from production] in helping to develop the relationship.”

Married At First Sight Series 3 continues every Thursday at 9pm. MORE: CORONATION STREET STAR ALAN HALSALL SHARES HIS AMAZING HAIR TRANSFORMATION (Via Cosmopolitan UK)

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AirPods 2: five ways to make Apple's wireless buds better

Hi again.

James Martin/CNET

A Bloomberg report suggests a new version of Apple’s wireless AirPods could be released this year, incorporating better wireless tech, improved water resistance, and improved Siri access. I’ve worn AirPods almost nonstop since they’ve been released, and they’ve become my instant, go-to earbuds for everyday use. But they could still use improvement.

Here’s what’s at the top of my list. More remote controls: I don’t know if I need to be instantly accessing Siri more often, unless it’s easy and not annoying to do. But I definitely want more remote features.

AirPods can be double-tapped to play, pause, skip tracks or summon Siri, but you can only assign one function to each AirPod for a maximum of two functions at a time. I want expanded controls, and also a way to adjust volume. Physical buttons would be nice for Bluetooth use with non-Apple products, but odds of that are slim.

I’d settle for the basic controls that HomePod has.

Now Playing: Watch this: A few things you might not know about Apple AirPods

2:22

Wireless charging: Apple has already confirmed that its proprietary wireless charging tech coming in 2018, AirPower, will work with AirPods via a new charge case. Charging AirPods via Lightning is easy enough, but it would be great to drop the case down and top it off on a charge mat, too. Will next-gen AirPods be the first to debut wireless charging, or will a case be sold separately for first-gen users, too?

The charge case for AirPods is already one of its best features: wireless charging would push it over the top.

Better device-swapping and wireless reliability: Apple’s second-gen W2 wireless chip could help AirPods gain longer range and maybe higher fidelity, but it’s also the little things that bug me on a daily basis. Sometimes AirPods don’t connect to my Apple Watch. Sometimes the swap between watch and iPhone doesn’t happen.

Sometimes I’ll get music drop-outs and stuttering while walking through NYC’s electromagnetic jungle. Generally, they’re great: in certain moments they’re not.

More fit options, improved design: AirPods fit me really well. For others, they don’t.

There should be a fit kit of different earpieces, or better in-ear options for all use cases so they don’t fall out. I’ve never had AirPods fall out randomly, but maybe a new design could allow for extra add-on tips. Third-party options exist but don’t always work well with the charge case. Also: AirPods jut out of my ears.

I’ve never looked great in them. Could those long handles be reduced a bit? I mean, I’ve gotten used to how I look in them a year and a half later, but a little bit of redesign couldn’t hurt.

New colors. This is easy: make more color options than white. Black. Green.

Blue. Pink. Go crazy.

Maybe let people have one color in each ear.

Have a bin full of color shades, and you could pick two to make your own?

But seriously: while there are ways to third-party customize beyond plain white, a few more official shades would be great.

SpaceX Starlink satellite broadband gets off the ground

A pair of small satellites named for an adventurous Belgian cartoon character could serve as proof of concept for an ambitious global broadband service envisioned by Elon Musk. After days of delays, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the two small satellites, newly dubbed Tintin A and B by Musk (but known more formally as Microsat-2a and Microsat-2b), lifted off from Vandenberg Air Force base in California on Thursday morning. The recycled rocket’s main mission was to launch Spain’s larger Earth-imaging satellite, Paz.

It’s a fairly routine delivery for SpaceX these days.

But once again SpaceX CEO Musk has sparked the public’s imagination with plans to build something unprecedented. In this case, it’s two constellations of satellites, totaling over 11,000 orbiting craft in all, meant to deliver terrestrial-quality broadband to anywhere on the globe, be it an Arctic research station or an African village. The Federal Communications Commission last year granted permission for the operation of the Microsats, but Musk only publicly acknowledged the existence of the prototype satellites this week, saying on Twitter that the Starlink broadband service “will serve [the] least served.”

Today’s Falcon launch carries 2 SpaceX test satellites for global broadband.

If successful, Starlink constellation will serve least served.

— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February 21, 2018

Paz and the pair of small satellites were successfully deployed about 11 minutes after the Falcon lifted off. Less than two hours later, Musk reported that the demonstration satellites had successfully deployed and begun communicating with Earth stations. He added that Tintin A and B “will attempt to beam ‘hello world’ in about 22 hours when they pass near [Los Angeles].” Also, the Wi-Fi password is “martians,” Musk joked.

The launch had been delayed three times from its initially scheduled date of Saturday, first to provide extra time to check out launch systems and an upgraded fairing, then because of high-altitude winds. The Falcon 9 booster used to deliver the three satellites to orbit was not recovered. It was previously flown on a mission in August and recovered to be reused for this launch.

SpaceX did try to use a new giant-net-on-a-boat setup that Musk announced after the launch of the Falcon Heavy earlier this month. It attempted to catch the fairing, which is the nose cone that protects the payload during ascent, but Musk reported that it missed its target by a few hundred meters, splashing down intact in the Pacific instead.

Tintin A and B are designed to communicate with each other through optical laser links and with ground stations on Earth. If all goes well and SpaceX receives approval from the FCC to begin launching its first full satellite constellation, we could see hundreds and then thousands of other small satellites being launched to a low Earth orbit to begin spinning up the broadband service.

Most satellite internet customers are currently served by a handful of satellites in high geostationary orbit, but Starlink’s lower-altitude constellations would instead use a swarm of satellites to provide low-latency connectivity that feels more like a cable or fiber-optic connection. All of this is likely several years and many more rocket launches down the road. Musk has said he hopes to see Starlink operational in the mid-2020s.

First published Feb.

22 at 6:58 a.m. PT.Updated at 8:36 a.m. PT: Added details on the deployment and activation of the satellites and the result of the attempt to catch the fairing.

Crowd Control: A crowdsourced science fiction novel written by CNET readers.

Solving for XX: The tech industry seeks to overcome outdated ideas about “women in tech.”

SpaceX Starlink satellite broadband gets off the ground

A pair of small satellites named for an adventurous Belgian cartoon character could serve as proof of concept for an ambitious global broadband service envisioned by Elon Musk. After days of delays, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the two small satellites, newly dubbed Tintin A and B by Musk (but known more formally as Microsat-2a and Microsat-2b), lifted off from Vandenberg Air Force base in California on Thursday morning. The recycled rocket’s main mission was to launch Spain’s larger Earth-imaging satellite, Paz.

It’s a fairly routine delivery for SpaceX these days.

But once again SpaceX CEO Musk has sparked the public’s imagination with plans to build something unprecedented. In this case, it’s two constellations of satellites, totaling over 11,000 orbiting craft in all, meant to deliver terrestrial-quality broadband to anywhere on the globe, be it an Arctic research station or an African village. The Federal Communications Commission last year granted permission for the operation of the Microsats, but Musk only publicly acknowledged the existence of the prototype satellites this week, saying on Twitter that the Starlink broadband service “will serve [the] least served.”

Today’s Falcon launch carries 2 SpaceX test satellites for global broadband.

If successful, Starlink constellation will serve least served.

— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February 21, 2018

Paz and the pair of small satellites were successfully deployed about 11 minutes after the Falcon lifted off. Less than two hours later, Musk reported that the demonstration satellites had successfully deployed and begun communicating with Earth stations. He added that Tintin A and B “will attempt to beam ‘hello world’ in about 22 hours when they pass near [Los Angeles].” Also, the Wi-Fi password is “martians,” Musk joked.

The launch had been delayed three times from its initially scheduled date of Saturday, first to provide extra time to check out launch systems and an upgraded fairing, then because of high-altitude winds. The Falcon 9 booster used to deliver the three satellites to orbit was not recovered. It was previously flown on a mission in August and recovered to be reused for this launch.

SpaceX did try to use a new giant-net-on-a-boat setup that Musk announced after the launch of the Falcon Heavy earlier this month. It attempted to catch the fairing, which is the nose cone that protects the payload during ascent, but Musk reported that it missed its target by a few hundred meters, splashing down intact in the Pacific instead.

Tintin A and B are designed to communicate with each other through optical laser links and with ground stations on Earth. If all goes well and SpaceX receives approval from the FCC to begin launching its first full satellite constellation, we could see hundreds and then thousands of other small satellites being launched to a low Earth orbit to begin spinning up the broadband service.

Most satellite internet customers are currently served by a handful of satellites in high geostationary orbit, but Starlink’s lower-altitude constellations would instead use a swarm of satellites to provide low-latency connectivity that feels more like a cable or fiber-optic connection. All of this is likely several years and many more rocket launches down the road. Musk has said he hopes to see Starlink operational in the mid-2020s.

First published Feb.

22 at 6:58 a.m. PT.Updated at 8:36 a.m. PT: Added details on the deployment and activation of the satellites and the result of the attempt to catch the fairing.

Crowd Control: A crowdsourced science fiction novel written by CNET readers.

Solving for XX: The tech industry seeks to overcome outdated ideas about “women in tech.”

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