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Samsung Galaxy S9 event: Watch it live here

After doing its own thing last year, Samsung returns to dominate Mobile World Congress 2018 on Sunday with the reveal of its next flagship phones, the Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S9 Plus. The latest members of Samsung’s large and high-powered Galaxy family give Samsung its first opportunity to return Apple’s iPhone X serve that was debuted last September. We don’t know what exactly Samsung will give us just yet, but as the event is titled “The Camera.

Reimagined,” something about taking photos is a good guess. Other rumors include a face unlock tool, a virtual fingerprint reader, a fast wireless charger and Qualcomm’s‘s Snapdragon 845 processor. The event takes place in Barcelona this Sunday, February 25 at 6:00 p.m. local time (find when the when in starts in your time zone).

If you can’t make it to Spain, fear not as you only have to bookmark this page to watch the event live. Of course, CNET will bring you all the details of the new phones as the event unfolds, followed by top analysis of what it all means from Samsung, Apple and the entire wireless industry. Our editors Roger Cheng, Jessica Dolcourt and Andrew Hoyle will be on the ground in Spain, so also follow them on Twitter at @RogerWCheng, @jdolcourt and @Batteryhq for the sights and sounds as it all happens.

Back in San Francisco, Brian Tong, Lexy Savvides and Stephen Beacham will host a live show around the event and will take your calls and tweets.

They’ll kick it off at 8:30 a.m.

PT (convert to your time zone), a half-hour before Samsung takes the stage.

Samsung Galaxy S9 will blow away the phone field at MWC: Looking ahead to the phones we’ll see in Barcelona.

MWC 2018: All of CNET’s coverage from the biggest phone show of the year.

Mobile World Congress 2018

UPS to deploy 50 plug-in hybrid delivery trucks

If you owned a business and could spend the same amount of money on a plug-in hybrid versus a traditional gas- or diesel-powered vehicle, would you opt for the greener solution? That’s what UPS is doing right now. UPS announced Thursday its intent to bring 50 new plug-in hybrid delivery trucks into its fleet.

The vehicles will be new from the ground up and developed by Workhorse Group, which has worked with UPS on green trucks in the past. It’s believed that the trucks will be comparably priced to ones that use conventional powertrains.

It’s a delivery van. It’s not going to be flashy, even with a new-age powertrain hiding underneath all that brown paint.

UPS

While there’s no production version to show off yet, UPS did supply a rendering of the truck, along with some basic specs.

A large battery will permit electric-only driving for about 100 miles per charge, enough to cover urban delivery routes. It’ll have a cab-forward design to make as much room for cargo as possible. The vehicles are expected to improve fuel efficiency by 400 percent when compared to UPS’ current non-PHEV fleet.

This first batch of PHEV delivery vans will be tested in cities such as Los Angeles and Atlanta. Later on, UPS and Workhorse will team up to flesh out a much larger fleet in the hopes of replacing many of the 35,000 diesel or gas trucks that currently run routes where a PHEV would be more efficient. UPS hopes that, by 2020, 25 percent of the vehicles it purchases will pack an alternative powertrain.

“With our scale and real-world duty cycles, these new electric trucks will be a quantum leap forward for the purpose-built UPS delivery fleet,” said Carlton Rose, UPS president of global fleet maintenance and engineering, in a statement. “The all-electric trucks will deliver by day and recharge overnight.

We are uniquely positioned to work with our partners, communities and customers to transform freight transportation.” Workhorse has made electrified moves in other areas, as well. The company unveiled its W-15 electric pickup, which has a range of about 80 miles but packs a gasoline range extender to bump net range to 310 miles.

It also developed the N-Gen electric van, which has a slightly longer range at 100 miles and an optional delivery drone.

UPS has been busy in other ways, as well, signing an order for 125 Tesla Semi electric trucks.

UPS to deploy 50 plug-in hybrid delivery trucks

If you owned a business and could spend the same amount of money on a plug-in hybrid versus a traditional gas- or diesel-powered vehicle, would you opt for the greener solution? That’s what UPS is doing right now. UPS announced Thursday its intent to bring 50 new plug-in hybrid delivery trucks into its fleet.

The vehicles will be new from the ground up and developed by Workhorse Group, which has worked with UPS on green trucks in the past. It’s believed that the trucks will be comparably priced to ones that use conventional powertrains.

It’s a delivery van. It’s not going to be flashy, even with a new-age powertrain hiding underneath all that brown paint.

UPS

While there’s no production version to show off yet, UPS did supply a rendering of the truck, along with some basic specs.

A large battery will permit electric-only driving for about 100 miles per charge, enough to cover urban delivery routes. It’ll have a cab-forward design to make as much room for cargo as possible. The vehicles are expected to improve fuel efficiency by 400 percent when compared to UPS’ current non-PHEV fleet.

This first batch of PHEV delivery vans will be tested in cities such as Los Angeles and Atlanta. Later on, UPS and Workhorse will team up to flesh out a much larger fleet in the hopes of replacing many of the 35,000 diesel or gas trucks that currently run routes where a PHEV would be more efficient. UPS hopes that, by 2020, 25 percent of the vehicles it purchases will pack an alternative powertrain.

“With our scale and real-world duty cycles, these new electric trucks will be a quantum leap forward for the purpose-built UPS delivery fleet,” said Carlton Rose, UPS president of global fleet maintenance and engineering, in a statement. “The all-electric trucks will deliver by day and recharge overnight.

We are uniquely positioned to work with our partners, communities and customers to transform freight transportation.” Workhorse has made electrified moves in other areas, as well. The company unveiled its W-15 electric pickup, which has a range of about 80 miles but packs a gasoline range extender to bump net range to 310 miles.

It also developed the N-Gen electric van, which has a slightly longer range at 100 miles and an optional delivery drone.

UPS has been busy in other ways, as well, signing an order for 125 Tesla Semi electric trucks.

UPS to deploy 50 plug-in hybrid delivery trucks

If you owned a business and could spend the same amount of money on a plug-in hybrid versus a traditional gas- or diesel-powered vehicle, would you opt for the greener solution? That’s what UPS is doing right now. UPS announced Thursday its intent to bring 50 new plug-in hybrid delivery trucks into its fleet.

The vehicles will be new from the ground up and developed by Workhorse Group, which has worked with UPS on green trucks in the past. It’s believed that the trucks will be comparably priced to ones that use conventional powertrains.

It’s a delivery van. It’s not going to be flashy, even with a new-age powertrain hiding underneath all that brown paint.

UPS

While there’s no production version to show off yet, UPS did supply a rendering of the truck, along with some basic specs.

A large battery will permit electric-only driving for about 100 miles per charge, enough to cover urban delivery routes. It’ll have a cab-forward design to make as much room for cargo as possible. The vehicles are expected to improve fuel efficiency by 400 percent when compared to UPS’ current non-PHEV fleet.

This first batch of PHEV delivery vans will be tested in cities such as Los Angeles and Atlanta. Later on, UPS and Workhorse will team up to flesh out a much larger fleet in the hopes of replacing many of the 35,000 diesel or gas trucks that currently run routes where a PHEV would be more efficient. UPS hopes that, by 2020, 25 percent of the vehicles it purchases will pack an alternative powertrain.

“With our scale and real-world duty cycles, these new electric trucks will be a quantum leap forward for the purpose-built UPS delivery fleet,” said Carlton Rose, UPS president of global fleet maintenance and engineering, in a statement. “The all-electric trucks will deliver by day and recharge overnight.

We are uniquely positioned to work with our partners, communities and customers to transform freight transportation.” Workhorse has made electrified moves in other areas, as well. The company unveiled its W-15 electric pickup, which has a range of about 80 miles but packs a gasoline range extender to bump net range to 310 miles.

It also developed the N-Gen electric van, which has a slightly longer range at 100 miles and an optional delivery drone.

UPS has been busy in other ways, as well, signing an order for 125 Tesla Semi electric trucks.

Musk stepping down from OpenAI board to avoid conflict

Tesla CEO Elon Musk is stepping down from OpenAI’s board amid concerns of a possible conflict of interest.

VCG via Getty Images

Elon Musk will step down as chairman of OpenAI, the nonprofit artificial intelligence research company he co-founded two years ago, amid concerns of a possible conflict of interest. Musk, the CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, will depart the board but continue to “donate and advise the organization,” the OpenAI said in a blog post Tuesday. “As Tesla continues to become more focused on AI, this will eliminate a potential future conflict for Elon,” OpenAI said.

Research in artificial intelligence, a term used for the ability of machined, computers or systems to exhibit humanlike intelligence, has been dominated lately by large tech companies such as Google and Facebook. The goal is to create machines that can perceive their environment and complete a wide array of every day tasks previously performed by humans.

Musk has said Tesla uses a “narrow AI” to help the company’s Autopilot software make decisions during limited autonomous driving without driver input. Musk founded the open-source AI company with Sam Altman, president of startup accelerator Y Combinator, in 2015 to keep tabs on AI development.

The field is promising but controversial: The worry is that machines equipped with super-smart technology could pose a danger to humans. Some industry watchers, including Musk and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, have grown concerned with how far AI can go and its potential dangers. In August 2014, Musk expressed fears that AI could be more dangerous than nuclear weapons.

Even famed physicist Stephen Hawking has voiced reservations about AI.

Tesla didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment from Musk.

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